Home ยป Antebellum Mansions at the Mississippi
It’s been a while since I posted the last time – mainly due to bad internet connections in many of the RV parks we stayed in.
From Carlsbad, we went eastward on I 20 to Dallas, where we spent the Easter weekend and Silke’s birthday. We stayed in a beautiful state park campground south of the city, and enjoyed the nice spring weather and an opulent birthday/easter breakfast.

We even had the luxury of our own, “private” garden behind our RV, where the Easterbunny could hide easter eggs and other goodies.

From Dallas, we drove further westward to Natchez, Mississippi, place of the largest number of undestroyed antebellum houses. Natchez is located on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi, and became the home of a number of very wealthy planters that owned vast cotton and sugar plantations in the surrounding river plains. Most of them survived until today and are now a major tourist attraction.

 Left: Melrose estate is now a national historic park, administrated by the national park service.

Stanton Hall
Dunleith house, now an upscale restaurant

Most of these houses were built between 1840 and 1860, and almost all of them in the Greek revival style, except the Longwood mansion, the largest octogonal house in North America. The interior was never finished because the war started and workers returned to their homes in Pennsylvania where they were from.

Longwood Home with an octogonal, 30,000 sf (2.700 qm) floorplan

Of course, wealthy Mississippi planters had built their mansions not only in Natchez. Further south, between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, is the home of the largest of all antebellum homes in the US, Nottaway Plantation.

It was owned by the descendants of the original family until 1970, and then sold to an Australian billionaire who runs it now as a hotel and a venue for events like weddings.

 

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